GSX-S1000 front image

SUZUKI ANNOUNCES DETAILS OF NEW GSX-S1000

After indicating earlier this month that a new GSX-S1000 was on the way, Suzuki has now released details of the 2021 naked, which comes with:

  • A completely new look, with sharp, aggressive new bodywork and futuristic LED lighting design.
  • An updated, Euro 5 compliant 152PS inline four-cylinder engine with a fatter and flatter torque curve, providing a broader spread of power in the low and midrange.
  • New electronics, including a quickshifter and auto-blipper, selectable engine maps and more levels of traction control.
  • A larger fuel tank and new, wider set handlebars.
GSX-S1000 light


Styling

Immediately obvious is the new GSX-S1000's redesigned aesthetic; the bodywork and lighting is completely new, with a focus on sharp, angular, aggressive lines and a powerful stance, with a ‘mass forward’ demeanour.

Available in Suzuki’s traditional metallic triton blue, a new mechanical matt grey, and a stealthy gloss black, it’s streetfighter looks are enhanced with textured radiator shrouds, MotoGP-insipired winglets, and side panels that feature an urban camo-inspired design.

Arguably the most striking visual change is the new, vertically stacked LED headlight. As well as the practical benefits of a new mono-focus LED light source that displays a wide, bright light, the new design of two stacked hexagonal units topped by LED position lights creates a look that is lighter and tighter, and aids the desire for a more aggressive pose. There’s a new LED tail light, too, with both flanked by LED indicators.

GSX-S1000 engine

Engine

The inline four-cylinder engine in the 2021 GSX-S1000 produces more power and a broader spread of torque in the lower rev ranges to deliver ideal naked sports bike performance. Changes include a new intake and exhaust camshaft, new valve springs, new clutch, and a new exhaust.

Compared to its predecessor, the new GSX-S1000 makes more cumulative torque across the rev range, filling in the dips in the graph with a flatter curve. It revs on to provide increased top end power, too, with peak power 152PS at 11,000rpm.

Thankfully, a new exhaust retains the soundtrack the outgoing model was known for, while aiding in the increase in power and the meeting of Euro 5 emissions requirements with an additional catalytic converter.

New electronic throttle bodies help achieve a more controllable engine response during the initial throttle opening. A new airbox manages to do without an internal separator, reducing intake resistance.

Reduced valve overlap also helps the new GSX-S1000 meet Euro 5 emissions standards, thanks to new a camshaft and revised cam profiles. The changes also aid engine controllability for the rider.

Added controllability and increased performance also comes thanks to Suzuki’s Clutch Assist System. The slipper clutch partially disengages to reduce negative engine torque and mitigate the effect of engine braking when downshifting from high rpm. This helps prevent the rear wheel from locking up or hopping and provides smoother deceleration, enabling the rider to shift down with greater confidence and maintain better control when downshifting into corners.

Adding an assist function increases the clutch’s clamping force under acceleration and thereby allows the use of softer springs while still efficiently transferring torque to the rear wheel, resulting in a lighter lever operation.

GSX-S1000 action image


Electronics

An advancement over the previous GSX-S1000 comes with an updated suite of electronics, courtesy of Suzuki Intelligent Ride System (SIRS).

A new ride-by-wire throttle makes it possible for riders to more accurately and finely control the relationship between throttle actuation and engine response, especially when allied to the new Suzuki Drive Mode Selector (SDMS) system, with which the new GSX-S1000 is equipped.

SDMS allows riders to choose from one of three engine maps, depending on the riding conditions or their own personal preferences. Modes A-C all deliver the same peak power, but vary the sharpness and immediacy of the delivery, with A mode the sportiest, and C mode delivering the softest power delivery.

Performance is enhanced thanks to a bi-directional quickshifter, which reduces the need to operate the clutch during gear changes or close the throttle on upshifts, or blip it on downshifts.

A new traction control system comprises five modes, while it can also be switched off. Inputs from front and rear wheel speed sensors, and crank, gear, and throttle position sensors feed into the ECU which in turn controls the throttle valve opening, ignition timing, and fuel injection rate, to reduce or prevent wheel spin.

All the information is displayed on an updated and easy-to-read LCD dash.

Topping off the electronics package is Suzuki’s always-handy easy start system – which requires only one prod of the starter button to fire the engine – and low RPM assist, which raises engine speed as the clutch lever is fed out, to aid slow speed control and prevent stalling.

GSX-S1000 wheel image


Chassis

The twin-spar aluminium chassis is mated to a rigid, GSX-R-derived swingarm for agile, sporty performance and handling. New, 23mm wider, tapered ‘bars help riders pitch the bike into turns with greater leverage. They are also set 20mm closer to the rider to improve comfort without compromising handling.

Suspension comes in the form of fully-adjustable KYB front forks and a preload and rebound damping adjustable rear shock, with revised settings from the previous iteration. 310mm front discs are paired with Brembo monobloc calipers.

A larger, 19 litre fuel tank and 46.3mpg equates to a tank range of 194 miles. Those miles can be undertaken in greater comfort thanks to a new seat.

Tyres are custom-engineered Roadsport 2 from Dunlop.

GSX-S1000 side shot

Pricing and availability

The new GSX-S1000 will be available in Suzuki dealerships from the end of June, with an RRP of £10,999.

HISTORY OF AN ICON: THE HAYABUSA STORY

There aren’t many more iconic and immediately recognisable silhouettes in motorcycling, and the GSX1300R Hayabusa wowed the two-wheeled world when it was launched in 1999. We’ve taken a look at its origin, the revamps, the stories, and the launch of the third generation.

'Suzuki Sets New Standards' read the headline in MCN following the launch of the first Hayabusa at the Circuit de Catalunya in 1999. The design brief was simple; wade into the hypersport motorcycle market and come out on top. And the Hayabusa (which translates to peregrine falcon, a bird of prey which has a top speed dive of 200mph and preys on blackbirds – geddit?) did just that.

Styled and designed to a purpose, the Hayabusa made an impression the moment you clapped eyes on it, with its flowing lines aimed at making it as aerodynamic as possible, allowing it to cut through the air with ease. And at the launch in Spain, every superlative imaginable was thrown in its direction, with the assembled press running out of ways to describe just how jaw-dropping it was.

Head of design on the original project was Yoshiura san, who described the idea he set out to achieve, saying, “The concept of the first Hayabusa was to create an original and dominating impact with superior aerodynamics, as well as being the most powerful sports motorcycle. I designed it with the intention of getting attention, using a unique motorcycle design. It needed to be the ultimate road-legal motorcycle with the highest performance from mass-produced bikes.”

It was immediately heralded as the fastest production bike on the market. At the launch, top speeds were clocked at the same point on the track as they were for the 500cc GP race the year before, with the Hayabusa just five miles an hour slower than the quickest prototype racer of the day, bike at the same point of the straight, and it wasn't flat out. Journalist Chris Moss described the speed and acceleration, saying “At 7,000rpm your arms feel like they're about to be wrenched out of their sockets.” And to cope with the power, Bridgestone developed a set of brand new tyres, the BT56J, which gave the Hayabusa a greater contact patch when leant over and greater stability at high speed.

Suzuki test rider, Yuichi Nakashima, said of the first Hayabusa, “I can say the Hayabusa's engine feels so overwhelmingly powerful and finely tuned that there is nothing like it. After riding it you won't want to ride another motorcycle. Just once experience the Hayabusa's powerful acceleration from low to high speeds and its nimble handling and you too will be hooked.”

It wasn't just the phenomenal power that the bike was praised for. The smooth, 1299cc inline-four cylinder engine provided masses of torque, making the Hayabusa more than just a road-legal missile, but a user friendly, real-world motorcycle, capable of shrinking continents. Bike Magazine's Martin Child reported from the launch, “You will not find a more torquey, rider-friendly engine. I completed two laps in top gear which saw everything from 30mph hairpins to the freedom of the straight and the bike pulled cleanly. The torque was instant and free-flowing.”

It was happy cruising at motorway speeds on long-distance trips, or on the casual Sunday ride out. And it handled too, with the chassis and agility the other key areas where the Hayabusa scored highly.

It became an immediate hit and cult status followed, with the Hayabusa becoming an icon. It was, and indeed, still is, the weapon of choice for top speed chasers, while drag racing strips became its second home. It also leant itself readily to customisation, with a number of people choosing to personalise their Hayabusas.

Jack Frost, who operates Holeshot Racing, has spent years chasing top speed records, as well as using his expertise to help others. But he's done both on Hayabusas more than any other model.

“When the Hayabusa came out in 1999, I got one straight away,” Jack explained. “I rode it standard to run it in and it was a great bike, as I have always said to people over the years. And they handle better than people would think; so easy to ride fast and eat up the miles. But it was by far the most powerful stock bike I had ridden and the obvious choice of bike to transform into a turbo bike.

“After a few months fettling mine, we managed 350bhp and a top speed of 228mph, still on pump fuel and a lot of standard components. After a few more changes we ran 257.4mph on the mile. It quickly caught on that turbochargers were a recognised add on for Hayabusas and at Holeshot Racing we sold hundreds of turbo kits around the world.

“But the 'Busa has such a great engine, as Suzuki are renowned for, and this shows by how long the model ran without change until 2008.”

Also testament to the strength and power of the Hayabusa power plant is the long standing relationship that Suzuki GB has formed with sports and racing car manufacturer, Radical. Since 2000, Radical have been using Hayabusa engines in a wide range of their sports and racing cars, including building a Hayabusa-based V8 engine, which features in the SR8 RX race car.

As for the customised scene, that took off nowhere more so than the United States, where the Hayabusa elevated itself to the top of the fashionable motorcycle list, also proving popular with music artists and sport stars. The instantly recognisable bodywork, extensive list of aftermarket parts and interchangeable Suzuki components, plus the silky smooth, powerful and easily tuneable engine meant it was the motorcycle of choice for custom shops up and down the USA, serving as a rolling advertising board for the potential of the custom builder.

Apart from an upgraded ECU, revised fuel injection settings and front suspension, it went relatively unchanged in the early years, until a radical overhaul on the 2008 model.

But, launched in September 2007 at the Salzburgring in Austria, the Hayabusa was back with a bang, eight years after the original made its debut in Spain. Updates included a stronger and more powerful engine, which increased the displacement to 1340cc, with new lighter and stronger engine internals and a redesigned gearbox and a broader torque throughout the rpm range. And to deal with the extra heat and power, and new, curved radiator helped keep the engine cool.

The newest 4-into-2-into-1-into-2 exhaust system featured a new oxygen sensor used by the engine management system to increase combustion efficiency by adjusting the amount of fuel injected into the cylinders, and  wind tunnel testing for the 2008 model centred around design refinements aimed at redesigning wind protection for the rider, while remaining true to the original design and iconic styling. Wind flow over and around the rider, both when in a normal seating position as well as when completely tucked in was improved. There were also changes to the front and rear suspension, brakes, frame, and wheels.

It was immediately heralded as the 'rebirth of a legend' by MCN, with senior road tester at the time Adam Child writing, “The word 'legendary' is over-used. So is 'iconic'. But both typify Suzuki's Hayabusa.”

Chief engineer Hiroshi Iio worked on the engine of the original Hayabusa, before being made chief engineer for the overall project. “When we were refining the design for the second generation, the team placed top priority on improving its already legendary aerodynamic efficiency. The Hayabusa really stands above and apart from other ultimate sport bikes, and its consummate form follows the function of the bike’s aerodynamic characteristics. Plus, its optimal balance and motion control translate into the ease of handling that you experience when actually riding the bike.”

The Salzburgring was the perfect track for the relaunch of the Hayabusa, with two long straights, flat out kinks and fast corners. And nearly 10 years after the original model wowed the assembled motorcycle press, here it was, at it again. Bike Magazine's Simon Hargreaves agonised over finding a flaw in his report, before conceding that, “the 2008 Hayabusa has me stumped because I honestly cannot think of a single thing wrong with it.” After it's introduction in 1999, it was back to reaffirm itself at the top.

Fast forward another five years and Brembo Monobloc front calipers graced the front end, which are lighter and more rigid than conventional bolt-together calipers, delivering better feedback to the rider. And to further aid stopping power, lightweight, high-performance ABS featured to match stopping power to available traction. It also came with new Bridgestone BT-015s, again, specially developed for the Hayabusa.

As GSX-R1000s and GSX-R1000Rs moved the supersport game on, with faster engines and superior handling, the Hayabusa’s place moved further into high speed comfort. Already a string in its bow, the Hayabusa was the ideal tool for swallowing huge miles in speed and comfort, with assured handling and performance.

But with tighter emissions regulations coming into force, the Hayabusa disappeared from European model ranges after 2018.

But in February 2021 a new version was announced. The third generation Hayabusa was here, retaining everything that made it so good, and getting updates to make it even better.

Over 550 new parts come with the new Hayabusa, the new hyperbike using a similarly iconic and uniquely individual Hayabusa aerodynamic silhouette and styling, a heavily redesigned engine – including new pistons, conrods, crankshaft, and camshaft – specifically aimed at producing enhanced performance in the lower to mid rev ranges making it the fastest-launching Hayabusa yet, a comprehensive suite of electronics that includes IMU-governed ABS and traction control, cruise control, launch control, bi-directional quickshifter, engine brake control, three power modes, plus three preset rider modes and three user-defined modes, and a revised chassis, with a new subframe, new brakes, and new suspension settings.

Since the Hayabusa ceased to exist in Europe, the motorcycling landscape has changed, not just from the standpoint of stricter emissions regulations, but also a market place. The Hayabusa's need to keep chasing peak power figures was no longer there. Instead, the focus was on thrust.

While litre sports bikes push out more peak power, even grunty GSX-Rs can't compete with the Hayabusa's shove at the bottom end, and the third generation Hayabusa has an even fatter torque curve, providing a wider spread of power in the lower rev ranges, which makes building speed effortless.

The biggest change, however, comes in the electronics department. A sophisticated suite of electronics means the new Hayabusa has everything you could want or need to cover ground quickly and in comfort. But it also stops short of technology for technology sake, meaning that it could be launch with an RRP of £16,499, too, ensuring it remained an awful lot of bike for relatively little money.

Added together it means the Hayabusa story continues, and another chapter will be written.

NEW COLOURS FOR V-STROM 1050 AND V-STROM 1050XT REVEALED

Suzuki has shown the colour options available on its 2021 V-Strom 1050 and V-Strom 1050XT, with bikes arriving in dealerships now.

Launched last year, the range-topping V-Strom 1050XT – which comes complete with three selectable engine maps, traction control with three modes, lean angle-sensitive ABS with two modes, linked brakes with slope and load-dependent control and hill hold, plus cruise control – remains available in the popular orange and white, DR750-inspired livery, but for 2021 it is joined by a classy, steely grey with blue decals and blue and grey seat, completed by blue spoked wheels.

An updated yellow option also features, unashamedly influenced by the firm’s RM-Z motocross range, with a black tank and gold rims. Gold rims also feature on an otherwise all black version, bar subtle grey and gold decals.

The V-Strom 1050 – which uses the same 107PS V-twin engine and many of the same electronics features as the XT but swaps the spokes for cast aluminium wheels and loses the standard fit engine bars and hand guards to come in at £9,999 – is available in a bold red and black livery and a more subtle all black option.

The new-for-2021 colours on the V-Strom 1050XT also apply to the Tour edition, which adds black three piece aluminium luggage as standard with 112 litres of storage space. With an RRP of £12,799 it equates to a saving of £370 over the purchase of the individual items.

2021 RM-Z RANGE AVAILABLE IN JANUARY

Suzuki’s Arenacross championship-winning RM-Z450 is available in its new 2021 livery from January, along with the MX2 RM-Z250 machine.

On both machines the standout yellow, synonymous with Suzuki’s off-road activity, is complemented by black radiator shrouds, white number boards, blue-topped seat, and retro-inspired, chunky RM-Z decals.

In 2020 the RM-Z450 picked up its fifth Arenacross championship since 2015, with Charles Le Francois winning for UK-based SR75 World Team Suzuki.

The title-winning RM-Z450 was completely redesigned in 2018 with a whole new chassis, making it the first production motocross machine to adopt Showa’s premium, race-proven balance free shock. It also put out more power than its predecessor with improved tumble flow, new intake cam profile, a 30% larger air filter aperture, new throttle body and injector.

The RM-Z250 benefitted from similar treatment a year later, with a new frame, swingarm, and suspension, plus a heavily revised engine for more power and torque. Both bikes get the Suzuki’s holeshot assist control and traction management systems.

2021 COLOURS REVEALED FOR SUZUKI’S 650 RANGES

Suzuki has revealed new colours for its 2021, Euro5-compliant 650 V-twin ranges, with updates to the ever-popular V-Strom 650 and SV650 machines.

The adventure-ready V-Strom 650XT, with spoked wheels and handguards plus traction control and low RPM assist, comes in a fresh version of Suzuki’s motocross yellow, complete with gold rims, paying homage to the off-road racing from the Japanese manufacturer.

Gold rims also adorn a new white edition, with gold and black accents on the tank, while a new black and red version plus a grey and blue model are also available.

The standard V-Strom 650 will come in red, white, and grey in 2021.

The middleweight naked SV650 is available in gloss black next year with a gold frame, or for those looking to stand out further from the crowd, a white model comes with a striking red frame and red wheels and black seat unit. Another matt black option is offset by a blue frame and blue wheels.

With dropped bars, a headlight cowling, and ribbed seat as standard, the café race-inspired SV650X comes in gloss black with a gold frame, but also swaps the chrome tipped exhaust and silver footrest hangers of the standard machine for all black items.

The 2021 V-Strom 650 and V-Strom 650XT plus both variants of the SV650 are available from January.

COVID STATEMENT -MESSAGE FROM SUZUKI GB

We want to assure you that Suzuki GB is following all Government advice and working responsibly with our dealer network to support you and our staff during the current Regional and National COVID restrictions. In light of the latest Government announcements, we would like to update you on how we are remaining open for business to support you through this period.

What sales and aftersales support can you expect from Suzuki and our dealer network during a period of enhanced COVID restrictions?

First of all, the safety of our customers and dealer colleagues is of utmost importance and as such Suzuki dealerships are operating with COVID safe working practices and have been since the National lockdown earlier this year.

The vast majority of our service departments remain open and continue to provide you with all the services you may need.  Staff will be taking safety precautions in a COVID secure way.

Depending on Regional legislation and Government lockdown guidance, some showrooms may be closed for physical appointments, however most of our dealers are still very much open for business (albeit digitally in some cases).

Suzuki dealers pride themselves on customer service and have sales teams on hand who can remotely discuss your requirements either by telephone, via video and on social media. Many can share video walk arounds of new and used bikes or send videos directly to you so that you can explore our products in your own time.

Bike deliveries and handovers continue to be carried out in a COVID compliant and safe manner, with social distancing observed. Should you wish to explore alternative delivery solutions (for example to your home), our dealer network can support this. New Suzuki machines will be prepared in advance and sanitized prior to handover.

Thank you for your understanding, and for helping us to ensure our dealerships are a safe place to visit and work. We are still open to serve you but please call our dealers first to discuss your specific needs and make an appointment.

BLACK AND ORANGE GSX-R1000R JOINS 2021 SUZUKI RANGE

Suzuki’s British Superbike and Superstock 1000 race-winning GSX-R1000R is available in a new black colour scheme for 2021, complemented by orange and grey accents and bold, grey, SUZUKI lettering, as a nod to the firm’s now well-recognised race bike livery.

Available in dealerships now, the GSX-R’s variable valve timing-equipped engine produces 202PS and features a comprehensive electronics package including a 10-mode, lean angle-sensitive traction control system, a quickshifter and auto-blipper, and launch control.

The new black and orange variant of the GSX-R1000R – which joins the 100th anniversary edition in Suzuki’s range in 2021 – is also available with £1000 off its RRP as part of Suzuki’s £1 per cc offer, meaning it can be had for just £15,999.

SAVE UP TO £1000 WITH SUZUKI'S £1 PER CC OFFER PLUS NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED

Suzuki’s popular £1 per cc offer will return this autumn, which will see customers able to enjoy savings of up to £1000.

Buyers of the British Superbike and Superstock race-winning GSX-R1000R – with its MotoGP-derived variable valve timing system and comprehensive suite of electronics – as well as the GSX-S1000, GSX-S1000F, and the new Katana will benefit from a £1000 saving.

Meanwhile there is £750 to be saved on the GSX-S750, plus a £650 discount on the V-Strom 650 and V-Strom 650XT, SV650, and SV650X.

In addition, all models are available on both PCP and Hire Purchase finance with no deposit required, making it even easier to make the switch to a new Suzuki.

SUZUKI RELEASES NEW COLOURS FOR GSX-S750

Suzuki has released two new colour options for its popular GSX-S750 naked, which includes a new blue and black edition with fluro accents as well as a grey and black version with striking blue wheels.

A reimagined blue and black livery sees a black tank, mudguard, seat unit, and belly pan complemented by blue radiator shrouds and side panels, all offset by standout fluro accents around the headlight and on the belly pan, plus the 750 graphic on the seat unit and rim decals.

Retaining the same black elements is a variant that swaps the blue to a subtle, classy grey, which is finished with blue details and blue wheels.

Adorning the tank and radiator shrouds of both models is a large GSX logo, reminiscent of the SUZUKI logo on the firm’s GSX-R machines.

The GSX-S750 produces 114PS from it’s GSX-R-derived engine, which is tuned for more street-focussed performance. It features a three-mode traction control system, plus Suzuki’s practical easy-start and low rpm assist aids.

And currently available with £750 off it means the GSX-S750 comes with an RRP of just £7249, and with a £2000 deposit or trade-in can be ridden for £60.30 per month on a three-year PCP deal.

V-STROM 1050XT WINS MOTO JOURNAL 

MOTORCYCLE OF THE YEAR AWARD

The new V-Strom 1050XT has picked up Moto Journal's award for motorcycle of the year, with a rating of 91 out 100.

The respected French title handed the award of moto de l'année to the new-for-2020 Suzuki V-Strom after a thorough evaluation focussing on the bike's ability, spec, and price.

The new V-Strom 1050XT uses the proven 1037cc V-twin engine from Suzuki, but meets Euro5 emissions regulations while increasing peak power to 107.4PS (79kW), a 7% increase over the previous generation.

And while the design harks back to the original and iconic DR Big and pays homage to that original adventure machine – both bikes were designed by the same person – a thoroughly modern and comprehensive suite of electronics dubbed Suzuki Intelligent Rider System (SIRS), sees the V-Strom 1050XT equipped with cruise control, lean angle-sensitive ABS, two ABS modes, slope-dependent control, load-dependent control, and traction control, plus a ride-by-wire throttle and three power modes.

FREE CITY PACK KIT WITH NEW V-STROM 1050

Suzuki is offering a free City Pack accessory kit with the new V-Strom 1050.

The pack – which usually retails for £549 – includes a spacious 55-litre top box, all the necessary mounting kit and a centre stand.

It means the V-Strom 1050, already lauded as one of the best-value adventure bikes on the market thanks to its RRP of just £9,999, now offers even more practicality. The free City Pack makes the true all-rounder an ideal tool for both weekend getaways and the daily commute, with plenty of space to keep your clothes and laptop for work while avoiding crowded public transport.

Launched this year the V-Strom 1050 uses Suzuki’s 1037cc V-twin engine which has been upgraded for Euro5, making 7% more power (107PS) whilst delivering strong liner torque from tick over to red line and 57.65mpg, giving an impressive 250mile range from its 20L tank. There are three power modes and three traction control settings to keep everything in check, plus the ability to turn the traction control off. It also gets Suzuki’s easy start and low RPM assist, which aids setting off and makes light work of town riding.

SUZUKI TO HOST SUPER 70 TEST RIDE WEEKEND

With the impending release of the ‘70’ registration plate in September Suzuki has announced a Suzuki Super 70 Test Ride weekend on 11-13 September, plus the chance to win one of three V-Strom 1050-themed Arai Tour-X4 helmets worth £649.

With almost all of Suzuki’s on-road dealer network taking part there will be no shortage of models to demo, including the new-for-2020 V-Strom 1050 – which currently comes with a free City Pack – and V-Strom 1050XT. Both bikes have the latest Euro 5 version of Suzuki’s fabled 1037cc V-twin, which now puts out 107PS. They also get a three-stage traction control system and three engine power modes. The XT adds cruise control, hill hold assist, load and slope-dependent control linked brakes, two ABS modes plus lean angle-sensitive ABS.

Those that take a test ride can enter a prize to draw to win one of the Arai adventure helmets by posting a picture of themselves with the new V-Strom to the SuzukiBikesUK Facebook page or by tagging @SuzukiBikesUK on Instagram or Twitter, and using the hashtag #SuzukiSuper70.

With a host of other offers running across the range there is also something for everyone. Suzuki’s ‘2-3-4’ offer – which allows customers to choose from either a two, three, of four-year PCP or HP deal with an APR to match – is available on the range-topping GSX-R1000R and the GSX-R1000, the GSX-S1000 super-naked and the faired GSX-S1000F, plus the middleweight GSX-S750, V-Strom 650 and V-Strom 650XT, and the Katana.

Many models are also eligible for a £500 discount when taken for a test ride, including the GSX-R1000R, GSX-S1000, GSX-S1000F, Katana, V-Strom 650, SV650, and SV650X. Those looking for a 125cc solution can also enjoy £500 off the GSX-R125 and GSX-S125 machines.

HAYABUSA LEGEND RE-LIVED ON LATEST INSIDE LINE PODCAST

The legend of the Suzuki Hayabusa is the latest topic to be discussed on the Inside Line podcast, as host Chris Moss talks to two other journalists that were on the launch of the original, a tuner, a race car builder, and a long distance traveller.

Martin Child talks to Moss about his attendance on the world launch for Bike Magazine, while Mark Hoyer dials in from the USA to talk about his experiences, plus the US Busa culture.

Sean Mills from Big CC reveals just what's possible from the Hayabusa's engine, and tells us about his 1000bhp Busa that's good for nearly 300mph, before Radical Sportscars Will Brown explains just why the Hayabusa engine is a perfect fit for their racing exploits.

Sushanth Shetty then showcases how the Busa is not just good at going fast, but good at going far, too, by recounting his trip from London to India.

SUZUKI OFFERS ADDITIONAL £500 OFF ON TOP OF EXISTING 0% APR FINANCE CAMPAIGN

Suzuki GB is offering customers an extra £500 off the RRP of selected models this spring, in addition to its current four-year 0% APR Hire Purchase finance deal that is currently available.

The money-saving offer follows the most recent government announcement, allowing dealerships to take orders online or over the phone and deliver new bikes and parts to customers, in line with social distancing measures. It means those looking for a new bike this spring can still take delivery and start planning those post-lockdown rides.

Available with both an additional £500 off and included in the 0% APR offer is Suzuki’s championship-winning GSX-R1000R and the GSX-R1000, along with the Katana and V-Strom 650 and 650XT. The GSX-S range – the 750, 1000, and 1000F – is also included.

Suzuki is also offering £500 off its SV650X and S650, taking their RRPs to £6099 and £5499, while extending its current £500 off campaign on the entry-level GSX-R and GSX-S125 machines, bringing the cash prices down to £3899 and £3599 respectively.

Suzuki GB head of motorcycles, Jonathan Martin, commented, “This is obviously a unique time for everyone. However, we’re also acutely aware that people want to look beyond the current situation, plan for the future and look forward to riding motorcycles again. By extending our offer into the start of summer we’re giving more people a chance to take advantage, put a new bike in the garage for less, and get ready to ride when the current restrictions are lifted.”

Terms & Conditions: 0% APR Finance available on Hire Purchase with £500 minimum deposit. £500 customer saving is available with or without finance.Credit is subject to status and is only available to UK residents aged 18 and over. Suzuki Finance, a trading style of Suzuki Financial Services Ltd, St. William House, Tresillian Terrace, Cardiff, CF10 5BH.

SUZUKI DEALERSHIPS TO OPEN ON JUNE 1

Suzuki's dealer network is set to re-open on June 1, and with the new V-Strom 1050XT in showrooms and a host of offers available across the range, it's the perfect time to head in.

Of course, despite the country's lockdown rules relaxing to a degree, Suzuki's dealerships will be following strict guidelines and practices around cleanliness and social distancing, plus the adoption of PPE where required, to ensure the safety and wellbeing of both customers and staff alike.

Yet with the new V-Strom 1050XT and V-Strom 1050 beginning to arrive in showrooms just prior to the lockdown coming to force, the re-opening will give many potential suitors their first chance to try one for size and take a test ride.

Suzuki is also currently offering 0% APR HP finance across much of its big bike range, as well as knocking £500 off the RRP to help customers get on a new Suzuki this summer.

Terms and Conditions:

0% APR offer applies to purchases of all variants of the GSX-R1000R, GSX-R1000, GSX-S1000F, KATANA, GSX-S1000, GSX-S750, and V-Strom 650/XT purchased from a participating Suzuki Dealership. HP finance only. Minimum deposit required: £500. Credit is available to UK residents aged 18 and over, subject to status. Suzuki Finance is a trading style of Suzuki Financial Services Limited. St William House, Tresillian Terrace, Cardiff, CF10 5BH. The purchase and registration of the motorcycle must take place between 01/02/2020 and 30/06/2020. This offer may be extended or withdrawn at any time.

 †To qualify for the £500 purchase contribution, simply contact your preferred Suzuki Dealer directly. Purchase and registration of your chosen motorcycle must take place between 27/04/2020 and 30/06/2020. £500 purchase contribution is available to both finance and non-finance customers. Offer may be extended or withdrawn at any time.