The newly renamed DAO Racing Kawasaki team has today unveiled the striking new Ninja ZX-10RR that Dean Harrison will campaign in the 2022 Bennetts British Superbike Championship.

With the covers being pulled off this morning at a busy London Motorcycle Show, race fans will immediately notice a departure from the traditional light blue colours that have adorned the team’s Kawasaki machines for the past few seasons. 

This reflects the team rebranding to DAO Racing, while the enhanced flashes of green showcase their close relationship with Kawasaki, with them being the Official Road Racing squad for the brand. These new colours will be seen at all 11 rounds of the 2022 Bennetts British Superbike Championship, while Dean will be running a slightly different design at the North West 200, Isle of Man TT and Ulster Grand Prix to reflect additional sponsors.  

Last year saw Dean enjoy one of his best-ever seasons in the BSB class, and the Bradford-based rider will be looking to build on that while also using it as a chance to help prepare him for the return of the roads.   

Ross Burridge, Head of Marketing & Racing Department at Kawasaki UK:
“This livery really is very striking! Although this is the same team, now known as DAO Racing, it’s great to have a fresh new look for the 2022 season. Dean has been making strides in the Superbike class at BSB over the past 12 months and I am sure he will be progressing again this year and ready to fight to retain his Senior TT winner title also! One thing is for sure, he will be doing it in style!” 

Jonny Bagnall, Team Manager at DAO Racing
“Following a complete rebrand for the team, we wanted a new look for our ZX-10RR and I’m delighted to reveal our 2022 British Superbike livery. This is the bike we will run at all BSB meetings this year and we will be unveiling our roads machine at a later date. 

We have chosen to go for quite a dramatic change in style and colours. Although we have stuck with blue, green and white, we’ve gone for a darker and brighter blue this year, moving away from our traditional old shade and have retained the green to reflect our involvement with Kawasaki. 

The livery also includes elements such as the Thai and Manx flags and I believe we’ve created a bold and striking machine to fly the DAO Racing flag in the Bennetts British Superbike Championship in 2022.”

The GR Motosport-run STAUFF Fluid Power Kawasaki team has made the exciting move to bring former BSB star Joe Francis into the Pirelli National Superstock Championship for 2022. Joe will campaign the entire season aboard the Ninja ZX-10RR machine.  

A successful 2021 season saw the STAUFF Fluid Power Kawasaki team secure race wins and podiums in the maiden year of the new Ninja ZX-10RR. Now with a year under their belts, the team are looking to build on this performance in 2022 and challenge for the National Superstock Championship title. 

To do this, they have signed former Bennetts British Superbike Championship star Joe Francis. The Chester-based rider previously rode for the GR Motosport squad in 2013, securing the British Motostar title in the process, so the duo will be looking to replicate that winning form this year. 

Joe Francis:
“I’m really looking forward to this year and a new challenge in the Superstock class. It is something I am excited about; my goal is to challenge for the championship title, and I am really motivated for the season ahead. 

It is nice to be back with Brent and the crew, working with the same team members I had back in 2013 when we won a championship together, and now we want to make it two. I am confident that with the programme and team around me that we can make it happen. I can’t wait to get going in a new class and I am thankful to Brent and all of my sponsors who have put me in this position for the 2022 season.”

Ross Burridge, Head of Marketing & Racing Department at Kawasaki UK:
“Having worked with Brent and his professional outfit for a number of seasons now and seeing how the team have continued to develop across a multitude of classes, we are excited to see what they and Joe can achieve in 2022. It’s always a tough class, but it’s an important one for every Manufacturer, so we wish them the best of luck for the season ahead.”

One of the most influential motorcycle designers of recent times has sadly died at his home in Japan at the age of 75. In December 2021, Shunji Tanaka passed away and leaves a considerable legacy in terms of his influence on motorcycle design while Design Director for Kawasaki based at their factory in Akashi, near Kobe, Japan.

As an integral part of Kawasaki’s K-Tec design department, Tanaka-san played a significant part in the introduction of a fresh, new approach to the styling of Kawasaki motorcycles both in terms of the bodywork and overall appearance plus the adoption of so called “signature colours” which defined the machines during their launch phase.

Already a highly respected automotive designer before joining Kawasaki, Tanaka-san is credited with the design direction of the Mazda MX5, the world’s top selling two seat convertible ever in terms of volume of sales with production now exceeding one million units. Moving from four to two wheels did not intimidate Tanaka-san; in fact, the remit to create bold designs for Kawasaki which embodied the uncompromising performance personality of the company resulted in a series of machines with instant impact and lasting appeal.

Marshalling his design team into a mutually supportive group – one of the keys to Tanaka-san’s success – was the democratisation of the design process with even the most junior team member having a voice and being able to contribute to the final finished product.

Applauded for his influence on the styling and visual appeal of the machines launched during his time as K-Tec design director, Tanaka-san was proud to be involved in the successful introduction of the water-cooled in-line four-cylinder Z1000 in 2003 with its distinctive quad exhaust system and angular lines and for overseeing the look of the dramatic and impressive 2004 Ninja ZX-10R and subsequent 2005 Ninja ZX-6R.

Creating a recognisable “face” for the machines his team were responsible for was no coincidence as Takana-san firmly believed that the “personality” of a motorcycle was determined by the upper cowl and headlamp area with the rest of the design flowing from, and influenced by, this crucial part of the styling exercise.

It is hardly surprising that among many and varied enthusiasms in his private life, that Shunji Tanaka had a passion for the “Noh” masks used in traditional Japanese theatre productions; each mask establishing the credentials and often complex personality of the character in the play.

Mercurial, thoughtful, and highly creative, Tanaka-san was an eminently approachable man whose evident enthusiasm for design was infectious. As a “landmark” along the considerable design journey that Kawasaki has taken – and continues to this day – Shunji Tanaka will be remembered with considerable respect and affection.

AKRAPOVIC SILENCERS FORM PERFORMANCE ACCESSORY PACK FOR HAYABUSA

Suzuki has launched a new Performance accessory pack for its Hayabusa hypersport machine, which comes with an RRP of £2,599, representing a saving of £1,112 over the cost of the individual items.

The standout accessory in the kit is a pair of titanium Akrapovic silencers, which save a total of 4kg and boost power by 2kW, as well as enhancing the soundtrack. Capped with a carbon fibre tip and featuring a carbon fibre heat shield, the silencers are finished with a classy, laser-etched Akrapovic and Hayabusa logos.

Billet aluminium brake and clutch levers replace the original items, with extra style coming from a colour-coded pillion seat cowl, an accessory seat with Hayabusa logo and red stitching, plus a tank pad also adorned with a Hayabusa logo in a choice of gold or red, to suit the bike’s colour.

The Performance accessory pack can be fitted at the time of purchase, meaning it can also be incorporated into any finance deal, spreading the cost monthly, and benefits from the same three-year-warranty.

With an RRP of £16,499, the third generation Hayabusa uses a heavily redesigned engine – including new pistons, conrods, crankshaft, and camshaft – specifically aimed at producing enhanced performance in the lower to mid rev ranges, making it the fastest-launching Hayabusa yet with more cumulative torque than its predecessor.

It gets Suzuki’s most advanced suite of electronics ever, with 10 lean angle-sensitive traction control modes, lean angle-sensitive ABS, three power modes, a bi-directional quickshifter, cruise control and a speed limiter, and three stages of launch control, all controlled via easy-to-use switchgear and managed through a neat colour TFT display, nestled between two analogue dials reminiscent of the original Hayabusa’s clocks.

Design cues from the original also extend to the bodywork, which is sharper and more angular but nonetheless immediately recognisable as Hayabusa.

SUZUKI TO ATTEND MANCHESTER BIKE SHOW AS EVENT RETURNS AFTER TWO-YEAR HIATUS

From the 2022 product range Suzuki will have its new GSX-S1000GT, offering the latest technology and all-day comfort. This sports-tourer will be showcased in its striking metallic triton blue and reflective blue colourways.

Also on display from the GSX-S stable will be the GSX-S1000, which combines aggressive looks, relentless torque, agile handling, and enhanced electronics.

Now in its third generation, the iconic Hayabusa – famed for its abundant power and imposing presence – will be displayed in it’s brilliant white colourway, following its UK debut in December.

From Suzuki’s twins range the V-Strom 1050 and V-Strom 650XT will feature alongside the SV650, with the 650s available on 2.9% APR Representative finance, with £0 deposit required and an additional £500 test ride bonus also available.

Other models on show include the refreshed Burgman 400 – the perfect commuter scooter – as well as the special edition GSX-R1000R Phantom.

Away from the road bikes, Suzuki will also display Kenny Roberts Jr’s world championship-winning RGV500 from the 2000 season, alongside the Yoshimura SERT Motul GSX-R1000R superbike, fresh from winning the 2021 EWC title.

The Manchester Bike Show takes place 29-30 January at Event City, Manchester, M41 7TB.

Suzuki can be found on stand 105. For ticket information, click here

TAKE A TOUR OF SUZUKI'S MOTORCYCLE LIVE STAND

Take a tour of the Suzuki stand at this year's Motorcycle Live show, and find out just what the Japanese marque has on display.

With Motorcycle Live back for 2021, after a year away as the result of the global pandemic, Suzuki, too, has returned to the show with another display of its latest on and off-road product ranges and a collection of classic and vintage models. Stealing headlines at this year's event is the gathering of all seven of Suzuki's world championship-winning Grand Prix machines, from Barry Sheene's 1976 and 1977 XR14 RG500s, to Joan Mir's 2020 title-winning GSX-RR. Join Ian, Steve, Tim Jak and Geoff for a closer look at the bikes on display.

SUZUKI RELEASES NEW COLOURS FOR V-STROM 650 RANGE

Suzuki has released new colour options for its ever-popular V-Strom 650 and V-Strom 650XT middleweight adventure machines.

The base model V-Strom 650 will continue to be available in the pearl brilliant white with its blue graphic on the beak, and for 2022 will be joined by a reversed option, which sees pearl vigour blue bodywork offset by white decals. A glass sparkle black scheme, with its black cast aluminium wheels, provides an understate all-black option, topped with a striking yellow beak graphic.

Suzuki's trademark yellow – synonymous with its off-road racing heritage – will remain available on the V-Strom 650XT, with RM-Z-inspired blue and grey graphics on the beak and tank. The look is completed with gold spoked rims.

The same gold rims feature on a white variant of the XT, while a classy, new-for-2022 blue paint scheme and an all-black with blue and grey graphics get treated to blue rims.

Both versions of the V-Strom 650 use the proven 645cc V-twin engine, packed with character and a broad spread of power and get traction control, Suzuki's easy start system and low RPM assist.The XT swaps cast aluminium wheels for lightweight spoked alternatives, and adds hand guards and a lower cowling as standard.

SUZUKI REVIVES THE PHANTOM WITH SPECIAL EDITION GSX-R1000R

Suzuki has revived the Phantom name with a new special edition GSX-R1000R, available with an RRP of £17,499.

Like the iconic GSX-R1000 K6 Phantom from 2006, the new GSX-R1000R Phantom is completed with a Yoshimura exhaust – this time an R11 silencer and heatshield finished in black metal magic with a carbon cap – and a smattering of genuine Suzuki accessories, including track-focussed brake and clutch lever guards, a tank pad and fuel cap trim, and a smoked double bubble screen.

A single seat cowl matches the matt black livery, which is complemented by gloss black decals. Standing out against the stealthy black colour scheme are gold wheels and gold Showa Balance Free front forks.

The GSX-R1000R produces 202PS from its inline-four cylinder engine, which uses the same variable valve timing system as the MotoGP world championship-winning GSX-RR. A full suite of electronics features a bi-directional quickshifter, lean angle-sensitive, 10-mode traction control and ABS, launch control, and three power modes.

OLYMPIC MEDALIST DECLAN BROOKS VISITS SUZUKI GB

Tokyo Olympic medalist Declan Brooks visited Suzuki GB last week to meet the team, show off his medal, and collect his new SV650.

Brooks claimed bronze in the freestyle BMX at the 2020 Olympics, the first time the sport has been included in the Games, but when not performing backflips and bar spins in mid-air the 25-year-old can often be found swapping pedal power for horsepower.

After passing his test in 2019 but being confined to an A2 licence, Brooks was finally able to graduate to a full A licence earlier this summer, and last week arrived at Suzuki’s UK headquarters to swap his restricted SV650X for a full power SV650.

While on site, the Team GB athlete was warmly welcomed by Suzuki’s motorcycle division, and spent the morning recounting tales from the Olympic Games while posing for photos with the team.

He said afterwards, “It was great to get up to see everyone at Suzuki and to pick up the new bike. They laid on a bit of breakfast, which was nice, and it was good to chat about BMXing, the Olympics, and just talk bikes. I don’t think it matters if it has an engine or not, if you’re into two wheels then you can get into any type of bike sport, and they spent a lot of time asking about BMX, the sport, and how we do what we do.

“It was good to swap to the full power SV as well. I’ve had to spend a couple of years on the restricted one but obviously rode the unrestricted version for my test, and we went out for a bit of a ride after I’d picked it up as well. I definitely think I’m going to like having a bit more power and I'm looking forward to getting some miles in before the end of the summer.”

Suzuki GB head of motorcycle marketing, Ian Bland, added, “It’s not every day you get to hold an Olympic medal, so we’re very grateful for Declan for coming in and meeting the team and sharing his experiences. It’s an incredible achievement and one he should be proud of. It’s also great to see he enjoys bikes with an engine in the middle as well as pedals, and has now passed his test and is embarking on his own motorcycle journey.”

SCOTLAND'S FOUR CORNERS CHALLENGE FOR CHARITY

Gordon Stuart is no stranger to motorcycle endurance rides, having completed various challenges previously, from John O’Groats to Lands’ End in 2016, to crossing the Arctic Circle in 2018, all in aid of UK brain injury charity Cerebra and special care babies’ charity Tiny Lives. Originally, Gordon intended his next challenge to be much further afield, until the Covid-19 pandemic had other ideas. Forced to look closer to home, he settled on riding his V-Strom 650XT between the four corners of mainland Scotland: 800 miles – with less than 50 miles of motorway – in under 24 hours.

Continuing with tradition, Gordon would complete this ride to raise money for Tiny Lives, a Newcastle-based charity supporting the Neonatal Unit at the Royal Victoria Infirmary. The charity supports over 750 babies and their families annually, and aims to raise £250,000 a year to maintain this support. Gordon and his wife received this support on two occasions, for their daughter Isla born in 2014 and then again with son Hugo born in 2017, with both spending time on the Neonatal Unit following premature births.

“Tiny Lives holds a special place in my heart,” he explained, “and with this ride I wanted to raise money and give back as a way of saying thank you for their care.”

In the run up to completing the four corner challenge, Gordon prepared by riding in the evenings around Northumberland and doing day routes of a few hundred miles, with limited motorway use. The challenge would be Gordon’s first long trip on the V-Strom 650XT, the do-it-all middleweight adventure machine, equipped with Givi Outback Trekker panniers and camping equipment on the pillion seat.

But at midday on Friday 16 July, Gordon set off from the Mull of Galloway, the southernmost point in mainland Scotland.

“The Mull of Galloway was stunning,” Gordon described on reflection. “I was lucky to visit on a lovely morning where from the top of the hill, where a lighthouse sits, I could see the Lake District to the east, Isle of Man to the south and Northern Ireland to the west.

“From there I headed north into Dumfries and through to Galloway and Ayrshire, following the coast between Stranraer and Girvan, before turning northeast towards Glasgow and then onto Stirling, which I reached at around 15:00, and had a brief stop.

“The ride between Stranraer and Girvan along the southwest coast was unexpectedly fun; sweeping bends, large rolling hills, with the terrain of Argyll and the Isle of Arran in the distance across the water. This made me pleased I’d ridden a route that wouldn’t have been on the list.”

After Stirling, it was onto Perth and the motorway section of the ride, which took Gordon past the imposing 220ft National Wallace Monument to the north of Stirling. On this stretch of the ride on the M9, Gordon found his V-Strom was comfortably keeping up with the traffic despite being loaded up, admitting he, “wouldn’t want to do a tour like this on a different bike.”

From Perth, Gordon headed east to Dundee through rush hour before turning north towards Montrose, Aberdeen, and then onto Peterhead where he made his next pit stop at 19:00. While there, he visited the most easterly point in mainland Scotland at Keith Inch, part of the Port of Peterhead, utilising the 650's nimbleness in town when looking for the port. From Peterhead the route headed west towards Inverness where Gordon stopped again, briefly, at 22:00.

Once back on the road, Gordon turned north to follow the NC500 route up the North East Coast to Thurso, then onto Dunnet Head, the northernmost point in mainland Scotland. It was at this point that the temperature dropped but Gordon powered on assisted by his heated vest (and an Alan Partridge audiobook!), arriving there for a scheduled stop at 01:00.

“At Dunnet Head I had a much needed, 90-minute rest in my pop-up tent, which, weirdly, was one of the most normal experiences on the trip: I was no stranger to solo camping, but social-distancing and masks was still very much out of the ordinary.”

Following the closest thing he'd get to a good night's sleep, he headed south from Thurso to Inverness before moving south-westerly along Loch Ness to Fort Augustus, where he stopped briefly again at 07:30am, before continuing onto Fort William.

“Riding south from Thurso towards the NC500 coastal route at sunrise was a delight,” Gordon recounted. “The road rides high over the plains of Caithness with unspoiled views of the northwest Highlands in the distance. And the route following the Great Glen from Inverness down to Fort William is something to behold. Again, I was lucky to ride in nice weather and doing so early in the morning meant, apart from a few deer, I had the road to myself.”

At Fort William, Gordon headed west towards Mallaig before turning south into the Ardnamurchan peninsula. This brought him on to the home straight towards the finish line at the most westerly point of Scotland’s mainland, Ardnamurchan Lighthouse, where he arrived at 11:21am, 23 hours and 21 minutes after setting off.

“The A830 from Fort William to Lochailort via Glenfinnan – and its famous viaduct – was possibly one of the best roads I’ve ever ridden on a bike; sweeping bends, dips and peaks, it was like the best rollercoaster I’ve been on with good views of the road ahead, long lochs, and mountains to the side. Great fun.”

Gordon had done it: 800 miles, all four corners of Scotland in under 24 hours.

“I was absolutely shattered but it was an amazing feeling to have completed the challenge,” Gordon said on reflection. “I was a little bit emotional actually. It was been beautiful the whole time, and it was amazing knowing I had so many people behind me.

“The bike was really comfortable, and it handled the twisty A and B roads of Scotland sublimely and was really confidence-inspiring. You can just throw it into the corners, and you know it will come out the other side where you want it to, it’s just easy to ride. It just seems such a workhorse. You can pile it high with gear and it just doesn’t care.”

Despite this ride not being part of Gordon’s original plan, he was glad he was able to make something positive out of the Covid-19 pandemic. Looking ahead to his next adventure, Gordon hopes to complete a multi-country Arctic ride to Russia (with no-less than 13 border crossings) to complete his years long ambition of riding a motorcycle across the Arctic Circle.

To donate to the Tiny Lives charity, click here.

BRAND NEW KATANA FUEL TANKS NOW IN STOCK ON VINTAGE PARTS PROGRAMME

Brand new, genuine Katana fuel tanks are now in stock and available on Suzuki’s Vintage Parts Programme, after the Japanese firm remanufactured a limited run.

With an RRP of £746.76 including VAT, the brand new fuel tanks fit GSX1100SD and GSX1000SZ Katanas and are finished in the glorious silver and adorned with the same red Suzuki lettering.

Suzuki GB aftersales co-ordinator Tim Davies, said, “We’re really excited to have these new Katana fuel tanks in stock, in the UK, and that the factory have been able to reproduce this limited run.

“No one needs me to point out how iconic the Katana is and how they’re still so sought after, and we see so many restorations or custom builds based on the bike. Of course, over time, bikes left to stand can suffer from all sorts of problems with stale fuel or water and moisture in the tank, so being able to replace it completely for a brand new, genuine item is a great thing to be able to do for a bike that is 40-years-old.”

Designed by Hans A. Muth and Target Design, the Katana was like nothing before it. It was a radical departure from current motorcycling fashion and was a sales success for Suzuki.

Other parts still available for the Katana include centre stands, brake and clutch levers, clock surrounds, sprocket covers, con-rods, pistons, and piston rings, an array of gaskets, valves, cotters, seals, and springs, and even the carburettor intakes pipe rubbers.

The new fuel tanks and other parts on the Vintage Parts Programme can be ordered through authorised Suzuki dealers.

CLASSIC SUZUKI SUNDAY FINALLY RETURNS TO THE SUPER SAUSAGE CAFÉ

After a year’s sabbatical following the Covid-19 pandemic, the Classic Suzuki Sunday is set to return the Super Sausage Café on 19 September.

Previous years’ events have seen packed crowds at the biker-friendly café off the A5 near Towcester, as Suzuki – through its popular Vintage Parts Programme – and Team Classic Suzuki display a range of 1970s, 80s, and 90s road and racing machinery.

Displayed at this year’s event will be the Team Classic Suzuki Katana endurance racer, which John Reynolds and Pete Boast raced to victory at Oschersleben. Sticking with the Katana theme, the outfit’s project Katana, based on world superbike underpinnings, will also feature.

Added exotica comes courtesy of a factory RGV250 racer from the 1997 Japanese championship, as ridden by Noriyasu Numata in its orange Rizla Suzuki livery.

Suzuki GB will also show off the GSX-R1100 and Bandit 600 rebuilt by apprentices on its Apprenticeship Programme, plus an RGV250 and the 1985 GSX-R750F restored at Motorcycle Live in 2015, as part of the model’s 30th anniversary celebrations.

Aftersales marketing co-ordinator, Tim Davies, said, “We are so incredibly happy that we’re able to put this event on again. It’s not far from Suzuki HQ and feels something like a home event, and after the year we had in 2020 we’re really excited to get back to the Super Sausage Café and bring our vintage fleet along with us. As well as the bikes we’re bringing, however, we are always keen to see what other people bring to the event, from GSX-Rs to GTs and everything in between. Traditionally there has always been a fantastic turnout, and being an outdoor event we’re hoping to see the bike park filled again this year.”

The Super Sausage Café can be found off the A5, between Towcester and Potterspury, Northampton, NN12 7QD.

SUZUKI'S MAGNIFICENT SEVEN ON DISPLAY AT MOTORCYCLE LIVE

With Motorcycle Live 2020 cancelled due to the global pandemic, Suzuki is celebrating its Grand Prix world titles a year later to make up for it. With Joan Mir winning last year’s MotoGP world championship for Team Suzuki Ecstar, Suzuki is marking his – and its other six – world championships at Motorcycle Live 2021.

Mir’s title-winning GSX-RR will be displayed in its resplendent anniversary livery, alongside Kenny Roberts Jr’s 2000 title-winning RGV500, Kevin Scwantz’s 1993 RGV500 in its famous Lucky Strike colours, Franco Uncini’s 1982 RG500, Marco Lucchinelli’s 1981 RG500, and Barry Sheene’s 1976 and 1977 world championship-winning machines.

Suzuki GB’s Tim Davies said, “Joan may have won last year’s championship but with the way of the world we never really got to celebrate it with fans and customers. So this year we’ve assembled all seven of our world title-winning Grand Prix machines for show-goers to see and look around, and it’s the first time ever all of these bikes will be displayed together.”

Away from the race bikes, Suzuki will display its current model lineup, including the newly-launched GSX-S1000GT, which blends sporting performance with touring practicality, thanks to a lightweight, agile chassis and a 152PS, superbike-derived engine, a comfortable riding position, and a suite of electronics that includes cruise control, traction control, a bidirectional quickshifter, selectable power modes, and smartphone connectivity all controlled through a colour TFT dash.

Also displayed for the first time will be the third generation Hayabusa, the latest iteration of the iconic hyperbike that gets the most comprehensive suite electronics of any Suzuki, ever, plus updated styling that remains faithful to the original and an engine that delivers turbine-like, creamy power throughout the rev range.

Other new-for-2021 models making their Motorcycle Live debut will be the GSX-S1000 naked and the A2-friendly GSX-S950, plus the refreshed Burgman 400.

From on-road to off it, the latest RM-Z450 motocross machine will feature, along with an SR75 Suzuki-prepared RM-Z250, while a DF350 marine engine and a KingQuad will even showcase Suzuki’s capabilities across its divisions.

From the Vintage Parts Programme stable, a GT250 EX7 that started life as one of Suzuki GB’s original press bikes will front a display of classic road and race bikes that will also include an original GSX-R750F and a 1999 Hayabusa, plus fan-favourite and three-time British Superbike champion John Reynolds will be present over the show’s two weekends.

Suzuki can be found on stand 3E15 in hall three.

For show information and tickets click here.

EURO5 GSX-R125 AND GSX-S125 ANNOUNCED

Suzuki has pulled the covers off its Euro5 GSX-R and GSX-S125 machines, with the new learner-friendly models available in dealerships next summer.

In 2022 the GSX-R125 – which has become the weapon of choice in the Freetech 125 Endurance Championship having won the title two seasons in a row – is available in the signature MotoGP blue with the bold, white SUZUKI graphic adorning the fairing, as well as a black and grey take on the trademark design, offset by red wheels.

The GSX-S125, which uses the same DOHC, free-revving single-cylinder engine as its fully-faired sibling, comes in a blue, black and silver, as well as a more subtle black and grey. A more eye-catching white and black with red decals and red wheels completes the set.

Both machines use a compact LCD dash and get Suzuki’s easy-start system. The GSX-R125 also features a keyless ignition system. 

Pricing to be confirmed.

STANDARD PETROL IS CHANGING TO E10 – KNOW YOUR FUEL

Know Your Fuel. In the Summer of 2021, the standard petrol grade in the UK will be changing to E10. The introduction of E10 petrol will help reduce CO2 emissions associated with petrol vehicles.

The good news is, most motorcycles are also approved to use E10 petrol, but for those who like to keep their classics running, they should check compatibility just in case. For the few vehicles that need it, E5 will continue to be available at most larger forecourts in the ‘super’ grade. E10 contains up to 10% bioethanol. 

The DfT have created the E10 Fuel Checker which enables riders to search for their PTW and check compatibility, prior to arrival at the pumps. Some PTWs made prior to 2011 will need to continue to use E5 petrol, which will remain available as the super grade petrol option at the pumps. Riders are being advised to use the super grade E5 option if there is any doubt in compatibility.